Heritage

Heritage

Call us old fashioned. Our past will always be a point of pride.

Built on a loyal following of ‘those in the know’, today Redbreast is the largest selling Single Pot Still Irish Whiskey in the world, and is considered 
the definitive expression of the traditional Irish spirit. Browse the timeline above to discover more about the Redbreast story.

1857 – 1886

1857 – Successful from the start

1857

W & A Gilbey was founded in 1857 and began in small basement cellars at the corner of Oxford Street and Berwick Street in London. Gilbeys benefitted greatly from the introduction of the off-licence system introduced in 1860 and a commercial agreement between Britain and France in 1861, following which, the British Prime Minister Gladstone reduced duty on French wines from 12 shillings to 2 shillings. Gilbeys were successful from the start and, within a couple of years, had branches in Dublin, Belfast and Edinburgh.

1861 – Wine importers and distillers

1861

By 1861 Gilbeys had premises at 31 Upper Sackville Street in Dublin (now called O’Connell Street), and were described as wine importers and distillers. They carried stocks of over 140 different wines and held between 700 and 1,000 wine casks under bond.

1866 – A distinctive brand

1866

In 1866, the company moved to new offices and stores at 46 & 47 Upper Sackville Street in the centre of Dublin (now O’Connell Street), which contained their own vaults. The buildings were previously the premises of Sneyd, French and Barton. The premises had its own tasting room and a small still for determining the alcoholic strength of wines and spirits. Gilbeys had their own patented bottle cases which could be easily stacked, a state of the art bottle washing machine and by this time, wax seals were replaced with their patented capsule seal. Gilbeys sold all their wines and spirits directly to consumers under their own distinctive brand.

1874 – 300,000 Gallons in bond

1874

Initially famous for their wines, spirits were becoming a greater part of Gilbey’s business. By 1874, Gilbeys held a stock in bond of over 300,000 gallons of whiskey sourced from “the most celebrated Dublin Distilleries”. The proprietary brand at this time was Gilbey’s Castle Whiskey. They sold three main brands Castle U P Irish Whiskey 33% under proof (u.p.), Castle U V Irish Whiskey 17% u.p. and Castle D O Irish Whiskey at full proof strength.

1875 – 996,000 Bottles a year

1875

At this point Gilbey’s held the largest stocks of Irish whiskey, outside of the distilleries themselves, of any company in the world. In 1875 they were selling 83,000 cases of Irish whiskey compared with only 38,000 of Scotch, a reflection of the pre-eminence of Irish Whiskey at the time.

1887 – 1932

1887 – An alliance with Jameson

1887

By 1887 W & A Gilbey were marketing John Jameson & Son’s ‘sole make’ pure and unblended Irish whiskey. Every bottle of Castle Grand Whiskey had a label certifying that it was Jameson’s and upwards of 6 years old. At the turn of the century, the company held a stock of over 700,000 gallons of John Jameson & Son’s whiskey which was “especially reserved for their celebrated brands”. The casks filled by Jameson were supplied directly by Gilbey’s who, as importers of sherry, had access to an ample supply of casks. Once filled, the casks were stored in Gilbey’s cavernous vaults in their Harcourt Street bonded warehouse.

1903 – The precursor to Redbreast

1903

In 1903, Gilbey’s whiskey brands included Castle Grand JJ Six Years Old and Castle Liqueur JJ Ten Years Old (JJ standing for John Jameson), both bearing the signature of John Jameson & Son. The following year, John Jameson & Son’s Castle “JJ Liqueur” Whiskey 12 Years Old, was being marketed at 4 shillings and 6 pence in a bottle, similar in shape, and bearing the red and white label seen on Redbreast bottlings up until the 1960s. Gilbey’s sold whiskey under the ‘Castle’ brand until at least the late 1930s.

1912 – Redbreast

1912

The first official reference to the brand name ‘Redbreast’ appears in August 1912, when Gilbeys were selling “Redbreast” J.J. Liqueur Whiskey 12 Years Old, described as one of their “famous” brands. The fact that Redbreast was already a famous brand suggests that this may have been the nickname for Gilbey’s Castle “JJ Liqueur” Whiskey 12 Years Old. The name ‘Redbreast’ itself refers to the bird, Robin Redbreast, and is attributed to the then Chairman of Gilbey’s, who was an avid bird-fancier.

1925 – “The Priest’s Bottle”

1925

1920’s Ireland was a time of political turmoil and economic uncertainty. Money was tight and money for fine whiskeys would have been a luxury beyond the means of most. Yet the country’s clergy enjoyed a life of considerable status and comfort so much so that Redbreast became affectionately known as ‘”The Priest’s Bottle” after finding its way into many a church presbytery in Ireland. Clearly, individuals of both spiritual and gastronomic enlightenment.

1933 – 1984

1933 – A staunch friend

1933

An advertisement in 1933 reads: “Redbreast Liqueur Whiskey at your service. You could not wish for a stauncher truer friend. Always ready to help. Refreshing you through the sultry, thirst making, days of summer, shielding you from the piercing winds and driving rains of winter, and in every season proving itself a most welcome and peace-bringing nightcap.” They don’t make advertising like they used to.

1964 – Moving and changing

1933 2 aspect ratio 1000 1000

In the mid 1960s, Redbreast was being bottled annually in batches of approximately 4,000 gallons (18,000 litres) to satisfy a steady demand for the brand. Minor changes to the bottle occurred throughout the 1960s including, from 1964, an age statement appeared on the foil cap seal. The familiar Redbreast white label with red writing remained largely unchanged until at least 1972.

1970 – “A Special Partnership”

1970

In 1970, Irish Distillers Ltd. (IDL) decided to phase out the sales of bulk whiskey ‘by the cask’ to the wholesalers and retailers (bonders) who bottled it themselves. Increasing export demand, and plans to increase its portfolio of brands, necessitated the retention of as much mature whiskey as possible. Gilbeys however, managed to persuade IDL to continue supplying them pure pot still whiskey for Redbreast until the closure of Bow Street Distillery in the summer of 1971.

1978 – Running low

1978

Over the life of the brand, the label has gone through various iterations. By 1978, the label had changed to a pale matt brown colour with a large stylised No.12 in white overprinted on which was the Redbreast name. In late 1980 the glossy label was ochre in colour with a smaller 12 in the background. Throughout the years however, other than the brand’s ill-fated dalliance with a blended version, the distinctive dumpy, rum bottle shape has been a constant.

1985 – 2010

1985 – The last of Gilbey’s

1985

The last bottling of Redbreast under the Gilbey’s banner occurred in 1985. In 1986 Gilbey’s, who had long since stopped maturing Redbreast in their vaults in Harcourt Street, entered into an agreement to sell the brand name to Irish Distillers.

1991 – Hallelujah! Redbreast Re-Launched

1991

In December 1991, Redbreast was re-introduced by Irish Distillers Limited, after an absence of almost 10 years. The veritable pot still whiskey was given a thorough makeover and benefitted from Irish Distiller’s revamped wood programme. The flawless pot still distillate from Midleton Distillery was now maturing in only the finest sherry and bourbon casks. Whiskey writer Michael Jackson said “IDG relaunched Redbreast as a 12 year old. This is traditional Irish pot-still at its richest: well matured and with a generous slug of sherry. For some lovers of this style, Redbreast approaches perfection.”

2003 – We All Make Mistakes….

2003

As a gesture to a local distributor of long-standing, Edward Dillon & Co, Irish Distillers supplied an exclusive bottling of a Redbreast pot-still and grain whiskey blend. Suffice it to say that the experiment didn’t quite work out. Let’s just leave it at that.

2005 – Redbreast 15 Launched

2005

In 2005, the seminal Redbreast 15 is released. This bottling was produced for long-time champion and French distributor of Redbreast, La Maison du Whiskey, Paris, as part of their 50th Anniversary celebrations. The whiskey, which is comprised of a slightly different formulation to the venerable 12 year old, was bottled at 46% abv (alcohol by volume) and was non chill filtered. The whiskey is an instant hit and in the following year, was named ‘Irish Whiskey of the Year’.

2011 – Today

2011 – Redbreast 12 Cask Strength Launched

2011

While Redbreast has a devout following, the Cask Strength represents the purest form of Redbreast, straight from the cask with no water added. As such each bottling differs slightly from its predecessor in terms of alcohol strength. Expect the usual Redbreast flavours but dialled up.

2013 – Redbreast 21 Launched

2013

The oldest whiskey in the Redbreast range, Redbreast 21 actually contains whiskeys up to 25 years old hand selected by our Master Blender Billy Leighton with new levels of depth, flavour and taste. Today Redbreast 21 is one of the most awarded whiskeys in the world and is the finest representation of the signature Redbreast sherry style.

2015 – Redbreast Mano A Lamh Launched

2015

Redbreast Mano a Lamh was a limited exclusive release of only 2,000 bottles for the members of the Stillhouse club. It was the first (and currently only) Redbreast to be matured solely in Sherry butts. The bottling was a complete sell out and is now a collectors item.

2016 – Redbreast Lustau Launched

2016

Built upon the success of Redbreast Mano a Lamh, Redbreast Lustau Sherry Finish edition is a permanent member of the Redbreast family. The bottling is distinctive from Redbreast in that it is initially matured in traditional bourbon and sherry casks for a period of 9-12 years. It is then finished for one additional year in first fill hand selected sherry butts that have been seasoned with the finest Oloroso sherry from the prestigious Bodega Lustau in Jerez, Spain. The sherry influence is dialled up in this unique expression.

2018 – Redbreast Dream Cask Is Realise

2018

After a live tasting of this whiskey on World Whiskey Day in 2017 reams of requests were received to bottle this one of a kind Redbreast. This call was answered with an exclusive launch of all 816 bottles to birdhouse members on World Whiskey Day in 2018. The whiskey was originally of bonded back in October 1985, with Single Pot Still Irish Whiskey filled into refill American Oak ex-Bourbon barrels. Then, on March 8th, 2011, the whiskey was re-casked into a 1st fill Oloroso Sherry-seasoned butt. After 32 years this Dream whiskey was selected by Billy Leighton as his Dream Cask as he deemed it be close to the perfect infusion of pot still, Spanish oak and sherry flavours that Redbreast is noted for.

2019 – The Dream Continues…. Redbreast Dream Cask Pedro Ximénez Is Launched

2019

The Redbreast Dream Cask series continued with the release of Redbreast Dream Cask Pedro Ximénez Edition; Master Blender Billy Leighton was inspired to create a Redbreast like never before. Matured for over 20 years in four different varieties of cask, then married and re-casked in a Pedro Ximénez sherry butt for a dream ending. Launched on World Whisky Day 2019, all 924 bottles sold out in just 14 minutes.

2020 – Redbreast 27-Year-Old elevates the storied reputation of this iconic whiskey even further.

2020

Building on the celebrated foundation of bourbon and sherry influence is the inclusion of ruby port casks for even more complexity and depth. Nearly three decades in the shaping, this cask strength Redbreast is a joy to behold in each and every bottle.

2020 – The Adventure Continues.. Redbreast Dream Cask Ruby Port Cask Edition Launches.

2020

World Whiskey Day 2020 sees the world introduced to the 3rd member of the Dream Cask Flock. Through trials and experimentation, Billy discovered that a mix of Bourbon, Sherry and Port casks, recasked into Port has produced something quite well…dreamy!

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